• Out of town and out of here

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  • On the knocker

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  • City investments hot up as £300m office deals go ahead

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  • People

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  • Driving commuters round the bend

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  • PREMIUMIndonesia to hold another ulema conference to bolster peace in Afghanistan

    first_imgForgot Password ? Topics : Linkedin Indonesia will host another ulema conference to help bolster stability in Afghanistan, which just received a major boost as the United States and representatives of the Taliban movement signed a peace deal in Qatar on the weekend.Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi, who was in Kabul on Sunday, held meetings with President Ashraf Ghani and a number of Afghan government officials to convey Indonesia’s support for “sustainable peace” in the country.The Taliban’s political chief, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, signed on Saturday the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) with US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad aimed at ending the Afghan war, the hard-line Islamist group said in a statement on Sunday.”The signing of the agreement between the US and the Taliban in Doha and the Joint Declarations of the Governments of Afghanistan and the … Log in with your social account Google LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Facebook Afghanistan Afghanistan-President-Mohammad-Ashraf-Ghani Retno-Marsudi peace-accord Talibanlast_img read more

  • Central Java children discuss bullying with UN special representative on Violence Against Children

    first_imgShe also told discussion participants to report any bullying they encountered to school authorities to deter the perpetrators.Bullying, she added, could happen anywhere in the world, including her own home country of Morocco. “What’s most important is that you know how to handle it.”The event was organized by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) as part of its 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to end all forms of violence against children, to realize the right of every child to live free from fear, neglect, abuse and exploitation. (vny)Topics : More than 150 children from various communities discussed coping with bullying in their surroundings with United Nations special representative of the Secretary General on violence against children Najat Maalla M’jid in Semarang, Central Java, on Friday.The dialogue about the prevention of violence against children was also attended by Central Java Governor Ganjar Pranowo.The UN special representative said the children could help victims of bullying by assuring them it was not their fault. “The victims are never wrong. It’s the bullies who are at fault,” Najat said in response to a student’s question on how to behave towards bullying victims. last_img read more

  • West Java to test those without COVID-19 symptoms as cases rise

    first_imgAs confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) increase in Indonesia, the West Java administration has moved to proactively test those who are suspected of having the virus but do not display symptoms.The West Java Health Laboratory – which is the nation’s referral center for tuberculosis – will conduct the tests in coordination with Padjadjaran University’s Laboratory of Microbiology and Parasitology and the Bandung Institute of Technology’s Laboratory of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.West Java Governor Ridwan Kamil said the laboratories were at “biosafety level two” on Sunday. He added that proactive COVID-19 tests would be prioritized for people under monitoring, identified as those who were possibly carrying the virus but showed no symptoms.“We will prioritize the cluster of paramedics who treated [COVID-19] positive patients and then potentially exposed foreign workers in Karawang. We will also test the families of the patients so we will be able to detect [the virus],” he said. “Hopefully, none of them will test positive.”Ridwan said the administration had purchased the COVID-19 test kits in February from a neighboring country “with a good relations” with Indonesia since well-proven testing kits were not yet obtainable domestically.He said the test kits produced results within five hours, so medical workers would be able to respond swiftly to any cases. As of Sunday, Indonesia had recorded 117 confirmed COVID-19 cases and five deaths from the disease. Eight people have recovered after receiving medical treatment, according to the government.The cases are spread across the country’s provinces, including Jakarta, Yogyakarta, West Java, Central Java, Banten, Bali, North Sulawesi and West Kalimantan.The West Java administration has allocated two waves of funding for coronavirus response from the regional disaster management fund, one of Rp 24 billion (US$1.6 million) and the other of Rp 50 billion.The allocations prioritize health equipment procurement, including self-protection equipment and respiratory aids, which will be distributed to hospitals across the province.“One third of the funds are for purchasing test kits, which will be used [to test] thousands of asymptomatic [people]. When there is an escalation, we can immediately check them,” said Ridwan. (syk)Topics :last_img read more

  • PTDI, Indofarma, universities working on ventilator prototypes

    first_imgState-owned aircraft manufacturer PT Dirgantara Indonesia (PTDI), pharmaceutical firm Indofarma and local universities are developing ventilator prototypes to help meet skyrocketing demand for the crucial medical equipment to treat coronavirus patients. Carmakers are also readying their factories to switch production lines to the manufacture of ventilators.PTDI president director Elfien Goentoro told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday that the aerospace company planned to mass-produce one of five ventilator prototypes currently being tested by the Health Ministry. The prototypes were produced in collaboration with universities and other institutions.  Several members of the Indonesian Medical Equipment Manufacturers Association (Aspaki) are also working on a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine as well as on noninvasive and invasive ventilator prototypes to help meet demand, said executive manager Ahyahudin Sodri.Universities have begun to develop their own ventilator prototypes. The Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Salman Mosque Foundation and Padjadjaran University’s School of Medicine (FK Unpad) are currently developing a noninvasive ventilator prototype called Vent-I.“We’ve completed the prototype, and it is currently being tested by the Health Ministry’s Health Facility Test Agency [BPFK]. Hopefully, our prototype can be used to treat patients with mild to medium symptoms before their condition deteriorates,” said Hari Tjahjono, external relations head of the Salman-ITB-FK Unpad ventilator team.State-owned pharmaceutical firm PT Indofarma is developing its own version of an invasive ventilator for critically ill patients.“Hopefully we can complete the prototypes by the third or fourth week of this month,” president director Arief Pramuhanto told the Post on Monday.Read also: Experts warn it will take time for local carmakers to producer ventilatorsLocal automotive manufacturers have been in talks with the Industry Ministry to develop ventilators. However, experts are saying it will take time to turn the idea into reality, since the carmakers will need product blueprints, raw materials and production line designs in partnership with the government and medical equipment manufacturers.Indonesian textile manufacturers have swiftly adjusted production lines to make PPE items such as masks and hazmat suits with a total capacity of 18.3 million pieces per month starting in May. However, local companies are struggling to manufacture medical-grade gear, test kits and ventilators.No local manufacturer is able to produce ventilators just yet, according to Aspaki.“Ventilators are considered to be high-risk medical equipment. Manufacturers have to comply with international safety standards in designing and producing the product. They also need to receive approval from either the Indonesian Health Ministry, European Conformity (CE) certification or a certificate from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before selling it commercially,” Ahyahudin said. Most of the components for ventilators are also imported from other countries, he added.Arief of Indofarma echoed those concerns, saying that local manufacturers were particularly hard-pressed to develop the invasive type used for critical patients, as they need special specifications to build one.Other than developing its own invasive ventilator prototype, Indofarma also produces equipment like hospital beds, IV posts and negative-pressured isolation stretchers.Read also: COVID-19: Textile factories face hurdles as they switch to producing medical gearArief said that the firm was also working to build a new production facility to produce surgical masks that was expected to start production by the end of April.“We expect the facility can produce 10 million to 12 million surgical masks a month,” he said.The company says it is continuing to innovate by developing a new product to be used for COVID-19 treatment facilities. “We just developed a new product called emergency isolation room that can be used by local administrations that need emergency treatment facilities outside of hospitals, such as in stadiums or public halls,” Arief added.A sharp increase in demand for masks has also prompted other manufacturers from various industries to produce masks and other PPE.Textile companies like publicly listed PT Pan Brothers and PT Sri Rejeki Isman (Sritex) have switched some of their production lines to making masks and coveralls. Pan Brothers agreed to produce 20 million washable masks and 100,000 jumpsuits by April, as ordered by the government and retailers.Most recently, conglomerate Sinar Mas Group announced that it plans to build a new production facility under its paper producer subsidiary, Asia Pulp & Paper (APP), that could produce 1.8 million surgical masks per month.Topics : “We have been asked by the Defense Ministry and the State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs) Ministry to join the COVID-19 ventilator team to produce prototypes for commercial use,” he said by text message. “Once the prototypes pass the Health Ministry’s tests, we are ready to modify our production lines to produce the ventilators.”Ventilators are in short supply globally as countries around the world scramble to contain the COVID-19 pandemic. The group of 20 largest economies (G20) has pledged to create a supportive global supply chain environment to address a global deficit of medical gear, notably for personal protective equipment (PPE), test kits and ventilators.Read also: Indonesian manufacturers step up as G20 nations coordinate global medical supplyIndonesia currently has 8,936 ventilators dispersed in 1,827 hospitals across the country, according to Health Ministry data from March 23. Meanwhile, the number of COVID-19 cases in the country has reached 2,738, with 221 fatalities, the highest death toll in Southeast Asia. Scientists have estimated that the number of cases could reach 71,000 by the end of April.last_img read more

  • Trump retweets, then deletes, video of supporter shouting ‘white power’

    first_imgIn the tweet, Trump wrote: “Thank you to the great people of The Villages”, a retirement community in Florida he visited last year.White House spokesman Judd Deere said the president “is a big fan of The Villages. He did not hear the one statement made on the video. What he did see was tremendous enthusiasm from his many supporters.”The tweet comes on the heels of Trump’s hostile response to protests against racial injustice engulfing the United States following the death of Floyd, an unarmed Black man who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes in Minneapolis.”It was so profanity laced, the entire thing was offensive. Certainly, the comment about the white power was offensive,” Scott added. “It’s indefensible. We should take it down.” Topics : US President Donald Trump retweeted a video showing one of his supporters in Florida shouting “white power” at protesters of his administration, drawing rebukes from allies and adversaries as protests continue in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death.The video on Twitter, which was later deleted from the president’s feed, showed Trump protesters and supporters in Florida shouting profanities at each other. After a protester called a Trump supporter a racist, the man responded by raising his fist and shouting, “white power.” The slogan is often used by white supremacists.”There’s no question that he should not have retweeted it and he should just take it down,” US Senator Tim Scott, the Senate’s only Black Republican, told CNN’s “State of the Union” program.center_img The Florida Democratic Party accused Trump of thanking “white supremacists” for their support and called on Floridians to deny him the swing state’s support in the November election.Trump has been accused of racism by lawmakers for attacks on Black lawmakers and for telling four congresswomen of color that they should “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.”Vice President Mike Pence refused repeated opportunities to say the phrase “Black Lives Matter” on Sunday, telling CBS’ “Face the Nation” program: “I really believe that all lives matter and that’s where the heart of the American people lies.”Pence added that he views the Black Lives Matter movement as having a “political agenda of the radical left” that calls for cutting off funding for police departments and tearing down monuments. last_img read more