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  • Tesla Registers Nearly 14000 New Model 3 VINs

    first_img Tesla Model 3 Coming To England And Australia Mid 2019 Almost all new VINs since a week ago are for RWD.Tesla doesn’t slow down after superior Q3 results and is moving right ahead by registering thousands more VINs for further Model 3s.The latest batch is 13,629 and almost all seem to be rear-wheel drive Mid Range versions.That brings new registrations for October so far to 51,883, including only 20,355 for all-wheel drive (less than 40%).The total number of registrations stands now at 169,791 (over 100,000 RWD and over 65,000 AWD).Tesla news #Tesla registered 13,629 new #Model3 VINs. ~0% estimated to be dual motor. Highest VIN is 169791. https://t.co/CbAbsrLRkz— Model 3 VINs (@Model3VINs) October 25, 2018 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 25, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Q3 2018 Earnings Report: Record Revenue, Turns Profitcenter_img Tesla’s China Factory Will Build Model 3 & Model Y Source: Electric Vehicle News It seems that Tesla is now focusing more on the more affordable Mid Range versions, which is possible because it achieved profitability and scale. Further increase in production will be easier because Mid Range versions require only one drive unit, compared to the popular dual-drive unit AWD in Q3, and less battery cells.Tesla Model 3 VIN Registrations (cumulative) – October 25, 2018last_img read more

  • Check Out The Nissan LEAF NISMO Inside Out

    first_img Nissan Confirms LEAF NISMO: On Sale End Of This Month So we’ve told the tale that the new Nissan LEAF NISMO doesn’t really pack performance specs. So, what do you get?We can only hope that the 2018 or 2019 Nissan LEAF NISMO is coming to the U.S. sooner rather than later — if at all — right? Yes, it’s a bit of a disappointment, since we have no indication that the LEAF NISMO may or may not make it’s way to our shores, though it seems that it would be considerably detrimental for the automaker to choose not to make that happen. Whether or not the Nissan LEAF NISMO is a performance giant, it needs to present itself in the U.S. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 29, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Watch New Nissan LEAF NISMO Out On The Test Trackcenter_img Additional Nissan LEAF NISMO News: Nonetheless, anyone who follows the automotive space, in general, knows that oftentimes the Nissan release of a NISMO model is more of a cabin and facade update, rather than that of a true performance champion. In some cases, yes, the NISMO goes well above and beyond, like that of the recent GT-R. But, in most cases, the NISMO badge, unfortunately, presents itself upon cars that don’t warrant that utmost level of celebrity. Oh well, with all of that being said, herein lies a detailed look at the brand-new Nissan LEAF NISMO.Video Description via High Channel on YouTube:2018 NISSAN LEAF NISMO FF – Exterior & Interior Watch This World’s First Drive Review Of Nissan LEAF NISMOlast_img read more

  • Opel Installs Over 160 Charging Stations At RD Center

    first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Opel/Vauxhall Grandland X PHEV To Lead PSA’s Electrified Future From 2019 On, Each New PSA Model Will Be Offered In Electrified Version Source: Electric Vehicle News See Also Another thing is that Opel will install an energy storage system, using 18 battery packs from the Ampera (aka Chevrolet Volt) – a second-life battery project.“In addition, a modular battery storage, which will reuse Opel Ampera batteries to temporarily store electricity, will be installed in the Test Center Rodgau-Dudenhofen. This so-called stationary “second life” application targets mitigating peak loads and thus stabilizing the electricity grid. A total of 18 vehicle batteries will be reused in the battery storage, which has the storage capacity to a supply a four-person household with electricity for a month.” Opel CEO Michael Lohscheller said:“Opel will be electric. We are now creating the required charging infrastructure at our Engineering Center in Rüsselsheim and simultaneously supporting politics and the authorities in the creation of an appropriate charging infrastructure. One thing is clear: electric-mobility will only be a success if vehicle development and expansion of the charging infrastructure go hand in hand,”.Tarek Al-Wazir, Deputy Prime Minister of the Federal State of Hesse said:“The energy transition is underway, now we need to make progress with the transport transition, especially in Hesse where around half of the energy demand can be attributed to transport. That is why we are driving electric-mobility by, amongst others, the widespread support for charging infrastructure. We are delighted that a Hessian carmaker in Opel will be playing an innovative and guiding part in developing the mobility of tomorrow,”. Vauxhall Confirms eCorsa Name For Upcoming Electric Hatch Opel CEO Michael Lohscheller: “Opel will be electric.”Opel announced a new project at the Engineering Center at the company headquarters in Rüsselsheim, Germany. Within a few months, more than 160 charging stations are to be installed to create a laboratory for electric mobility.The new infrastructure will become handy as Opel intends to introduce four electrified models by 2020, and have an electrified version of each passenger model by 2024.“Together with Kassel University, FLAVIA IT and PLUG’n CHARGE, the two latter companies that specialize in charging infrastructure, the carmaker will conduct research into the ideal setup of the electricity grid for the future. The three-year project “E-Mobility-LAB Hessen” is scheduled to receive supportfrom the Hessian Ministry for Economy, Energy, Transport and State Development with funds provided by the European Regional Development Fund. In return, Opel will set up an intelligent charging and infrastructure system for electric cars in its Engineering Center.In total, more than 160 charging stations, which will charge the electric car fleet of the Engineering Center in future, will be created. Extensive and well-founded simulations of numerous scenarios will be possible based on actual data, ensuring the transferability of the results. The concept was developed together with House of Energy, the think tank of the Hessian energy transition.”last_img read more

  • News Rivian Electric PickupSUV Revealed

    first_imgOut of Stealth Mode, New Company Shows Power Truck EVsIt’s not as though no one’s talked about electrifying the all-American pickup truck. Various mild, full hybrid, plug-in hybrid and full-electric versions have been introduced during the past decade by a potporrie of  OEMs and start-ups. But Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018, marked a new and seemingly more significant new model. The star of the technology day at this year’s Los Angeles Auto Show, dubbed AutoMobility LA, were the sibling R1T and R1S. The alphanumeric designations indicate the first full electric full-size truck and its companion SUV.This truck looks ready to rumbleThe trucks, unveiled in near-production form, build conventional looking bodies on a skateboard battery and power it with 147-horsepower electric motors at each wheel. Although the profiles may look similar to current models, the front definitely defines it as an electric car trying to make an impression.Stand-Out SpecsI’ve spent a good portion of my career around trucks and SUVs and my first impression is that these guys get it! The proportions, performance and functionality should appeal to the traditional truck buyer while the addition of electric drive opens up a whole new market. Assuming they can execute it (always a question with a start-up, even if it’s nine years old, has 500 employees and has received $450 million in private funding).What lies underneathThe key engineering for the Rivian vehicles comes out of its Michigan office, and the specs show they’ve staffed up with engineers who not only know, but love trucks. That’s how you come out with the massive power numbers, sophisticated suspension built around long half shafts that enhance the flexibility and ground clearance of the trucks, and stats like a 34-degree approach angle, 30-degree departure angle and a 26-degree breakover angle (for the pickup; the SUV is 30-degrees).  If those numbers don’t mean anything to you, you haven’t spent much time driving a truck off-road. They are the critical performance numbers for a core segment of buyers in this market. The 0-to-100 mph in seven seconds will take care of another group of enthusiasts, while the 11,000-pound towing capability will appeal to another. Finally, there’s the posh, but functional interior that will attract another group of potential buyers.So, When Is This Real?Rivian announced that its pickup is in final testing and validation and will begin production in the recently purchased Normal, Illinois, plant in 2020 for delivery in the latter half of that year. Pricing has been announced as starting at $69,000 for the pickup (before incentives), although that is clearly for the base model (105 kWh batteries, 230-mile range), which the company says will not be produced initially.The now ubiquitous monster tablet dominates the dashTaking a page from Tesla’s playbook, Rivian is going to start producing the high-end models with the 180 kWh/400-mile range batteries, allowing it to bring in top dollar from early adopters will cash to burn. The company, which is selling vehicles direct a la Tesla, is accepting $1,000 refundable deposits.The Rivian R1T and R1S were designed from a clean sheet of paper, as founder and CEO R.J. Scaringe, a mechanical engineer and MIT grad, told the crowd at the LA unveiling. He emphasized that the clean sheet did not mean repudiating the past, just disrupting the powertrain and related components, then playing out the changes that enabled in the overall vehicle design. It looks like a winner; we can’t wait to drive one.The post News: Rivian Electric Pickup/SUV Revealed appeared first on Clean Fleet Report. Source: Electric, Hybrid, Clean Diesel & High-MPG Vehicleslast_img read more

  • Tesla Achieved World Class Result With Model 3 Production Says Analyst

    first_img Tesla Model 3 Deliveries In Norway Expected To Begin In February Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Mid Range Gets Official EPA Rating While many considered (and still do) Tesla as one of those companies that will either fail miserably or be the next best thing since sliced bread, the truth is – as always – somewhere in the middle. The two years following Musk’s announcement were just that – production hell – but it made the company grow out of its infancy stage, helping it become one of the most prominent carmakers in the world. And mind you, we’re not talking about “just” electric vehicle makers. And evidently, this is most true when you consider last Recode Decode podcast, where Musk revealed how that Tesla is now at a point where it is no big deal for the company to produce 5,000 Model 3 per week.However, Musk noted how Tesla’s employees had to put out “an excruciating effort” to both refine and improve the Model 3 production, in order for the ramp up to achieve the desired goals and help the company produce the vehicle at the numbers it is doing so today. And the result of this effort didn’t go unnoticed. In a recent visit to the Tesla Fremont factory, one Wall Street analyst was seemingly left really impressed.Pierre Ferragu of New Street Research can be considered as one of Tesla’s most prominent supporters in Wall Street. He holds a $530 price target on Tesla stock, making him a firm believer in the electric car maker and its future.Last Tuesday, Ferragu noted how the California based carmaker made a lot of mistakes in the early stages of the Model 3 ramp up. He even went as far as describing Tesla’s Fremont factory as a “crowded mess” in its current state, all due to the facility’s complexities. One example is the intricate conveyor belt system that was eventually scrapped and replaced with human workers. In turn, this resulted in the process being 30% less productive than what the company first anticipated.However, Tesla pushed through all of these problems, resulting in a company that’s more accustomed to mass production of vehicles. The Wall Street analyst notes how Tesla’s production processes are only bound to get better from this point, particularly as the company is in a constant state of improvement. Furthermore, he thinks that the lessons learned from the Tesla Model 3 “production hell” are likely going to result in some new production facilities – such as the Shanghai-based Gigafactory 3 – being built right from the getgo, with all the optimizations and lessons learned implemented right away. In turn, this will allow Tesla to produce vehicles a lot faster and more efficiently.“All these (mistakes) feed a lot of (the) bear argument on the company. We see it the exact opposite way. Failure is where one learns the most. By shooting way too high, Tesla failed on its original plan, but achieved a world-class result. The next production sites will be much more efficient, and will ramp very rapidly.” Overall, the analyst summarizes Model 3 ramp: “Tesla failed on its original plan, but achieved a world-class result.” Furthermore, Tesla is only at the half-way point for the Model 3 production numbers. The carmaker eventually aims to produce 10,000 Model 3s per week, as the vehicle is slated to start getting delivered to customers in Europe and Asia. In light of this, Ferragu notes how the odds are that the Model 3 ramp to 10,000 per week will likely be a far less painful process for the company.Tesla eventually aims to manufacture 10,000 Model 3 per week, particularly as the vehicle starts getting delivered to territories such as Europe and Asia. In this light, Ferragu stated in his note that Tesla’s Model 3 ramp to 10,000 per week would likely be a far less painful process for the company.“The road to 7,000 units per week seems easy, and limited capital expenditures will be required (in the low tens of millions) to get to 10,000,” the analyst wrote.Tesla is still in a very delicate state. But as things move along, the fear that some had (including me) for the company’s future, are slowly being replaced by optimism all across the board. Let’s not forget, Tesla is a young company. They didn’t have the backing of an already-in-place industrial system that would ensure things go smoothly. And even so, with the recent example of Porsche announcing their own “production hell,” it seems that bringing a completely new vehicle and technology to the market is never an easy process. But, with Tesla doing so good and the legacy carmakers joining in on the fun, an electric future seems less and less doubtful, and a lot more certain.And that, by all measurement, could very well mean our grandkids don’t have to float on a raft somewhere in the middle of the ocean, fighting modern-day pirates once the sea levels go up and the climate change kicks all of our butts in the only way mother nature can: hard and without any regret.Source: Teslarati Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 7, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News While the result is world-class, the path was nothing short of a production-hell-avoiding pool of misery.Certainly, you may think the above line is simple over-exaggeration. However, all the things that Tesla, its management, workers and customers went through with the Model 3 production and market launch, couldn’t be described better. After all, when the company rolled off the first 30 production Model 3s off the line back in July 2017, Elon Musk bigheartedly welcomed Tesla’s employees to “production hell.”More about the Tesla Model 3 Tesla Model 3 Versus Chevrolet Bolt EV: High Voltage Components Comparedlast_img read more

  • New home of future French grand prix is revealed

    first_imgFormula One 2009 This article is more than 10 years old The French grand prix is set to return – but not at Magny-Cours, above. Photograph: Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images Share on Messenger Since you’re here… Motor sport • Work to begin shortly on 112 million euros circuit near Paris• Flins Les Mureaux expected to be ready for 2011 season Topics Thu 12 Mar 2009 13.31 EDT Share on Pinterest Share via Email Share on Facebook Formula One Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Formula One Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter news Support The Guardian The French grand prix could return to the formula one calendar in 2011 after plans for a new circuit were unveiled today.With Magny-Cours having staged its final race in the 2008 season, France has not been awarded a grand prix for the next two years, giving the French authorities time to find and build a new venue.Having looked at a shortlist of five potential circuits, Flins Les Mureaux, on the north-west outskirts of Paris, came out on top and is expected to stage the French grand prix in 2011.The 4.5km track, designed by French architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte, will cost 112 million euros to construct, and was the cheapest of the shortlisted options.It will permanently replace the Circuit de Nevers at Magny-Cours, which has staged the last 18 French grands prix but was never popular with formula one drivers or organisers due to its remote location. Magny-Cours was originally stood down in 2007 only to win a reprieve for last year’s race, won by Felipe Massa on 22 June.British construction experts Apex UK, who worked on the recent Dubai Autodrome project, will head up the project to build Flins Les Mureaux, with work expected to begin imminently. New home of future French grand prix is revealed Share via Email This article is more than 10 years old First published on Thu 12 Mar 2009 13.31 EDT Share on WhatsApp Shares00 Reuse this contentlast_img read more

  • Study shows impact of optimizing airport flight patterns on human health

    first_img Source:https://www.mailman.columbia.edu Aug 15 2018Health costs associated with noise from changing flight patterns over populated urban landscapes far outweigh the benefits of reduced flight times, according to a new study conducted at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Queens Quiet Skies. The researchers used flights from LaGuardia airport that have historically flown over Flushing Meadows and the U.S. Tennis Center in Queens – known as the TNNIS route — as a case study to explore the trade-offs between more efficient flight routes and suffering on the ground. The findings appear in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTSmarter, more educated people get a cognitive ‘head start’, but aren’t protected from Alzheimer’s”Airports in the U.S. have gradually been transitioning to automated flight systems,” said Peter Muenning, MD, professor of Health Policy and Management at the Mailman School. “These systems generate new flight paths over populated areas. While they can improve flight efficiency, the increased noise associated with these novel flight patterns potentially pose serious health threats to nearby communities — including cardiovascular disease and anxiety disorder as consequences of noise.”The year-round use of ‘TNNIS Climb’ at La Guardia implemented in 2012 was a result of flight automation in New York City. No environmental assessment or environmental impact statement was ever performed on the route.”Flights from LaGuardia airport have historically flown over Flushing Meadows in Queens,” noted Muennig, who also leads Global Research Analytics for Population Health at Columbia.”During U.S. Open tennis matches, the residents of certain neighborhoods in Queens had to endure heavy airplane traffic over their homes, but it only lasted a few weeks. Now, they have to contend with it year-round.”The researchers compared the costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained associated with reverting to pre-2012 flight patterns seen prior to the year-round use of TNNIS. The TNNIS climb increased airplane noise to above 60dB over some of the most densely populated areas of the city.”Our study focuses on health and economic impacts of a single flight route as a result of flight automation, however, our analysis uses inputs that may be generalizable to other settings,” observed Muenning. “The results point to the strong need for careful study of public health impacts of such changes before they are implemented.”last_img read more

  • People fall into trap of greater inactivity during middle age research reveals

    first_img Source:https://www.uth.edu/media/story.htm?id=13869d07-e138-40df-ae5e-0101ee0ec16b Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 24 2018People are falling into a trap of greater inactivity during middle age, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), which calls for its findings to be considered in future national physical activity guidelines.The study, published today in the American Journal of Epidemiology, is the first time age-related physical activity changes, from inactivity to vigorous exercise, have been examined at such a large scale across midlife. People in the study who were between the ages of 38 and 50 dropped their activity rates over the next decade by an average of a half an hour a day and replaced it with doing something sedentary.”We know higher intensity physical activity tends to decline with age. But these findings show just how much even gentle forms of activity that are part of daily routines, like casual walking, slip in midlife, which doesn’t bode at all well for future health and should serve as a wake-up call to us all,” said first and corresponding author Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Ph.D., M.S., associate professor of epidemiology, human genetics and environmental sciences at the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at the UTHealth School of Public Health Austin campus.Investigators were able to draw the conclusions using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study, also known as CARDIA, which started following 5,115 participants between ages 18 to 30 more than 30 years ago, measuring their activity levels with an accelerometer, or activity monitor, that is similar to a pedometer.These decreases of physical activity over a 10-year period in middle age were observed in both men and women. However, the decline was steepest among black men who typically started being the most active but reduced their activity levels by nearly one hour daily. Black women began as the least active, and continued to have the lowest physical activity levels 10 years later.”Our next step is to determine what is causing these changes towards a more inactive daily routine. It could be that during midlife people become busy with their jobs and taking care of children and aging parents. Or, they may be experiencing more difficulty moving around because of aching joints, for instance,” Gabriel said. “What’s clear is that these trends are happening at a time when people face increased risk of disease and disability. Yet, compared to older adulthood, they’re also potentially in a better position to introduce more physical activity back into their daily routine, particularly as they retire.”Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTNational guidelines recommend at least two and a half hours of moderate intensity activity per week, or an hour and 15 minutes of vigorous intensity activity per week, or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous intensity activity. They also discourage prolonged sedentary time.Physical activity is advised to help manage conditions including obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. There’s also a growing body of evidence demonstrating the health benefits for older adults of undertaking light intensity physical activity, such as going for a gentle stroll or doing household chores. Such evidence led to the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee recommendation that additional research is needed for further understanding.”Given the findings of our study and others, the health consequences of age-related switches from time spent in light intensity physical activity to sedentary pursuits merit serious consideration and could pave the way for future physical activity guidelines to set targets in these important areas,” said Gabriel. “Making relatively small lifestyle changes, and taking advantage of missed opportunities to be physically active could have a crucial bearing on how people are setting themselves up for being more resilient during older adulthood. Simple changes all add up, like walking to the corner coffee shop, parking further away from the store entrance or taking the stairs rather than the escalator.”Barbara Sternfeld, Ph.D., emeritus research scientist of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, was senior author of the study, which was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Institute on Aging, both part of the National Institutes of Health.The vision of UTHealth School of Public Health is to improve the health of the population through prevention, better health outcomes and a trained population health workforce.last_img read more

  • Gut microbial signature may help identify causes of chronic malnutrition in children

    first_img Source:https://www.pasteur.fr/en/press-area/press-documents/chronic-malnutrition-children-new-gut-microbial-signature Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Aug 24 2018Chronic malnutrition, usually associated with an inflammation of the small intestine, affects one in every four children under the age of five. It is the leading cause of child mortality in low-income countries and is also responsible for severe stunting. The Afribiota project, led by the Institut Pasteur in Paris, the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar and the Institut Pasteur in Bangui, in collaboration with the University of British Colombia, Inserm and the Collège de France, was set up to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of chronic malnutrition and improve treatment. A first study recently demonstrated microbiota disorders in malnourished children, revealing the existence of a surprising microbial signature in the gut, characterized by the widespread presence of bacteria that are normally found in the nose and mouth. The findings were published in the journal PNAS on August 20th, 2018.Chronic malnutrition affects one in every four children under the age of five worldwide. It claims more than 3 million lives every year and results in impaired cognitive and physical development, especially stunted growth, which can be difficult to overcome.”With traditional treatment, in other words providing affected children with micronutrients, a balanced diet and ample food while treating the underlying infections, we can only correct 30% of growth delays,” explains Pascale Vonaesch, holder of a PhD in Microbiology and a member of the Molecular Microbial Pathogenesis Unit at the Institut Pasteur. “There really do seem to be a number of phenomena that have not yet been elucidated.”Chronic malnutrition is not only linked to a lack of food; it is also associated with immune problems and chronic gut inflammation, the workings of which are not yet fully understood. The Afribiota project, carried out in collaboration with the Institut Pasteur in Paris, the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar and the Institut Pasteur in Bangui, was set up in 2016 precisely to find out more about the underlying mechanisms of these disorders and to develop more effective treatment.In this first study, the scientists focused on the children’s gut flora, one of their aims being to characterize the bacterial populations that colonize the small intestine in malnourished children.”We know that these children suffer from gut inflammation. The villi in the small intestine in particular become blunted, preventing the intestine from effectively carrying out its role in digestion and the absorption of nutrients,” says Philippe Sansonetti, a physician and microbiology researcher in the Molecular Microbial Pathogenesis Unit, which he leads at the Institut Pasteur. “But we didn’t know to what extent the usual bacterial populations were being altered.”Related StoriesDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesPositive family relationships can buffer children from poor asthma outcomesResearch reveals genetic cause of deadly digestive disease in childrenTo shed light on this question, the stools and duodenal juice of 400 children living in Antananarivo (Madagascar) and Bangui (Central African Republic), both with and without chronic malnutrition, were analyzed. Bacterial cultures and metagenomic analyses aimed at revealing all the microbial species present were also performed, yielding surprising results.”We expected to see an increase in enteropathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter, Shigella or even Salmonella in the malnourished children,” comments Pascale Vonaesch, “but we certainly didn’t expect to see oropharyngeal bacteria!” “What also surprised us was the sheer number of these bacteria,” adds Philippe Sansonetti. “We had already observed this type of phenomenon for some inflammatory bowel diseases and colon cancer, but never such large-scale migrations. There are 10 to 100 times more bacteria than in the control patients.”Oropharyngeal bacteria, some of which are known for their inflammatory properties, seem to have literally crossed the barriers that usually keep them in the nasopharynx and the mouth, migrating towards and colonizing the stomach and the intestine. This unusual, large-scale migration was observed in malnourished children from both Madagascar and the Central African Republic, in other words independently of their origins, eating habits and environment.The origins and consequences of this microbial signature in the gut, characteristic of chronic malnutrition, are yet to be elucidated, even if initial theories are already emerging. “We know that children affected by malnutrition also often have poor oral hygiene and suffer from repeated colds. So there could be an overgrowth of oral and nasopharyngeal flora which may then be swallowed and, in the absence of effective controls, arrive in the digestive system,” suggests Philippe Sansonetti. “It is important to clarify this information so that we can issue effective prevention messages.”In the long term, this gut microbial signature, together with data from the epidemiological, biological and anthropological research carried out for the Afribiota project, should help identify the causes of chronic malnutrition, facilitate diagnosis and ultimately improve treatment of this global health threat.​last_img read more

  • Record ozone hole may open over Arctic in the spring

    first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Environment Canada Cold weather and a strong stratospheric vortex have allowed a deep Arctic ozone hole to open up. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) At Earth’s surface, ozone is a caustic chemical and a health hazard. But in the stratosphere, it shields the planet from ultraviolet light. Scientists noticed in the 1980s that chlorine-containing chemicals commonly used in refrigerants were reacting to form compounds that ate away stratospheric ozone, especially over the poles. The 1989 Montreal Protocol led to the phaseout of those chemicals, but their long atmospheric lifetime means that seasonal ozone losses will persist well into this century. Every year, a major ozone hole opens up over Antarctica, where winters are colder and polar vortices are stronger and more stable than over the Arctic.But this year, the Arctic could be the poster child. Cold temperatures have allowed nitric acid, mostly from natural sources, to condense and form the peculiar, iridescent clouds that have been spotted all over northern latitudes this winter. “They’re beautiful, but once I see them, I’m concerned—they’re dangerous,” Rex says. That’s because the clouds catalyze the reactions that mobilize chlorine into active chemicals that can react in the presence of sunlight to destroy ozone.An instrument on the NASA AURA satellite has detected record lows of the inert forms of chlorine and rising amounts of the active ones, notes Gloria Manney, an atmospheric scientist at NorthWest Research Associates in Socorro, New Mexico. “Conditions are primed,” she says. “The last ingredient we need is sunlight.” Weather models are predicting some warming of the stratosphere this week, she adds, but probably not enough to halt the ozone destroying brew. Lingering atmospheric pollutants and a blast of frigid air have carved an unusually deep hole in Earth’s protective ozone layer over the Arctic, and it threatens to get deeper. Atmospheric scientists are analyzing data from weather balloons and satellites for clues to how the ozone will fare when sunlight—a third factor in ozone loss—returns to the Arctic in the spring. But they are already worrying about how extra ultraviolet light might affect humans and ecosystems below and wondering whether climate change will make such Arctic holes more common or severe.Record cold temperatures in the Arctic stratospheric ozone layer, 15 to 35 kilometers up, are the proximate cause for this year’s losses, because they help to unleash ozone-destroying chemicals. “This winter has been stunning,” says Markus Rex, an atmospheric chemist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Potsdam, Germany. By next week, about 25% of the Arctic’s ozone will be destroyed, he says.This time of year, the stratosphere tends to warm up with the breakdown of the polar vortex, a cyclone that traps cold air. But if a strong vortex persists another month as light returns to the Arctic after the dark winter, ozone losses will get much bigger, Rex says. Conditions are ripe for losses to surpass a record Arctic ozone hole observed in the spring of 2011, he adds. The Arctic vortex tends to behave erratically, with blobs of cold air often dipping into more heavily populated northern latitudes. The influx of ozone-poor air could cause problems for people there, who are unused to wearing sunscreen in March, Rex says. “If we get such a deep minimum, then people need to be informed,” he says. The extra radiation could even adversely affect phytoplankton, which typically bloom in the Arctic Ocean each spring, Rex suggests.Ross Salawitch, an atmospheric chemist at the University of Maryland, College Park, says the health hazards shouldn’t be sensationalized. “The worst-case scenario would be folks in high northern latitudes being in a type of ultraviolet environment that people are exposed to all the time in San Diego.”For Salawitch, the bigger question is what role climate change might be playing. The notoriously mercurial polar weather is the main factor determining how much ozone is destroyed each spring, he says. But climate change is also expected to cool the stratosphere over the long run. The same greenhouse gases that trap heat in the lower atmosphere allow the stratosphere to more effectively radiate energy into space.On its own, the stratospheric cooling could make bad ozone years in the Arctic more common. It should also make polar vortices stronger, and more stable. But there is evidence that storminess at lower latitudes—another thing that is expected to increase in a warming world—will make stable polar vortices less common.Which effects will win out? Salawitch offers a parallel to hurricanes. Climate change is expected to make tropical hurricanes less frequent but more intense. Persistent Arctic vortices, too, could become scarcer but stronger. “When you have cold winters, they tend to be whoppers.” And that could mean that Arctic holes like this year’s could get deeper in the future.last_img read more

  • The James Webb Space Telescope takes shape

    first_imgArtist’s conception showing Webb’s segmented mirror—one of several innovative components designed to unfold in space en route to Webb’s final orbit 1.5 million kilometers from Earth. Artist’s conception showing Webb’s segmented mirror—one of several innovative components designed to unfold in space en route to Webb’s final orbit 1.5 million kilometers from Earth. NASA/Chris Gunn One of Webb’s gold-coated beryllium mirror segments is inspected before assembly at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. NASA/Chris Gunn One of Webb’s gold-coated beryllium mirror segments is inspected before assembly at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Webb’s superthin, lightweight sunshield—here being tested at Northrop Grumman in Redondo Beach, California—will protect the telescope and its instruments from the sun’s heat. With six segments installed, Webb’s 6.5-meter mirror is one-third complete. Northrop Grumman Corp. ‹› Inside the cryo-vacuum chamber at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center engineers prepare to give Webb’s instruments a taste of simulated space. NASA/Chris Gunn Webb’s secondary mirror just after being coated with gold at Quantum Coating Incorporated. NASA/Chris Gunn Contamination control engineers at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center inspect Webb’s mid-infrared instrument (MIRI), newly arrived from Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom. center_img NASA/Chris Gunn By Robert CoontzFeb. 17, 2016 , 3:00 PM NASA/Chris Gunn: K. W. Don, University of Arizona Webb’s instrument module (inside the gold-colored frame) just before testing began in Goddard Space Flight Center’s pressure cooker–like cryo-vacuum chamber where it was subjected to a frigid vacuum awash with infrared light. NASA/Chris Gunn NASA/Chris Gunn NASA/Chris Gunn: K. W. Don, University of Arizona Photo illustration: James Vaughan Photo illustration: James Vaughan For months, the four scientific instruments at the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope have been sealed in what looks like a huge pressure cooker. It’s a test chamber that simulates the grueling operating conditions they will face after Webb is launched into orbit in 2018. But in fact, “pressure cooker” is an apt metaphor for the whole project. The infrared Webb observatory is the biggest, most complex, and most expensive science mission that NASA has ever attempted. Like that of its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope, Webb’s construction has been plagued by redesigns, schedule slips, and cost overruns that have strained relationships with contractors, international partners, and supporters in the U.S. Congress. Lately the project has largely stuck to its schedule and its $8 billion budget. But plenty could still go wrong, and the stakes are high: Both the future of space-based astronomy and NASA’s ability to build complex science missions depend on its success. Engineers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center cover Webb’s fine guidance sensor/near-infrared imager and slitless spectrograph—one of four scientific instruments on board the observatory. An engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center attaches the first of 18 hexagonal mirror segments to its backing frame. The James Webb Space Telescope takes shapelast_img read more

  • Factchecking Congresss fetal tissue report

    first_imgReport, p. xxxix:“In over 100 years of unrestricted clinical research, human fetal tissue has failed to provide a single medical treatment …”Fact: Several important medicines now on the market were created using fetal tissue. Amgen’s Enbrel battles rheumatoid arthritis; Genentech’s Pulmozyme helps children with cystic fibrosis clear the thick mucus that clogs their lungs; and Nuwiq, made by Octapharma, treats boys and men with hemophilia, a life-threatening bleeding disorder.Report, p. 379:“Several letters [from the Association of American Medical Colleges and others] … suggest that human fetal tissue is used for modern vaccine production. In reality, none of the nearly 75 vaccine formulations currently licensed in the United States is produced using human fetal tissue …”Fact: The WI-38 and MRC-5 cell lines, derived from two fetuses that were aborted, respectively, in 1962 in Sweden and in 1966 in the United Kingdom, are used to produce the following vaccines, all licensed and marketed in the United States: Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sanofi-Pasteur’s Imovax rabies vaccine is propagated in MRC-5 cells. When they were introduced in the 1970s, human fetal cell–propagated rabies vaccines supplanted dangerous and occasionally fatal animal tissue–produced rabies vaccines. Merck’s chicken pox and shingles vaccines are propagated in MRC-5 cells; they are produced at a relatively new company plant in North Carolina. The weakened “Oka” virus used in both vaccines was initially attenuated in WI-38 cells. Merck’s rubella vaccine—the “R” component in the MMR vaccine given to U.S. infants and preschoolers—is propagated in WI-38 cells on the company’s campus northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Merck has shipped nearly 700 million doses of the rubella vaccine since its launch in 1979. Also known as German measles, rubella, like Zika virus, attacks and damages fetuses in the womb. Hepatitis A vaccines are marketed in the United States by both Merck and GlaxoSmithKline; both companies propagate their vaccines in MRC-5 cells. The polio component of Sanofi Pasteur’s U.S.-marketed Quadracel vaccine (which also protects against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus) is propagated in MRC-5 cells. The adenovirus vaccine that since 1970 has protected nearly 10 million members of the U.S. military from respiratory infections is propagated using WI-38 cells. The House of Representatives Select Investigative Panel investigating the procurement of fetal tissue for research has disbanded, but not before recommending that the National Institutes of Health be required to stop funding fetal tissue research, and that the huge health provider Planned Parenthood be stripped of U.S. funding. On the heels of the panel’s call, House speaker Paul Ryan (R–WI) said on Thursday that he would include a provision defunding Planned Parenthood in a high-priority bill repealing the Affordable Care Act. Republicans have long sought to block Planned Parenthood from receiving U.S. funding because it provides abortions as well as birth control and preventive health services.The dissolution of the panel—which Republicans called “The Select Panel on Infant Lives”—follows an expansive, 15-month investigation prompted by undercover videos released in the summer of 2015. In these, antiabortion activists posed as biotechnology executives. They interviewed senior physicians from Planned Parenthood, who spoke bluntly about their provision of fetal tissue from legal abortions for medical research—a process that is legal under a 1993 federal law as long as the provider recovers only costs for donating the tissue.Chaired by Representative Marsha Blackburn (R–TN), who is now helping steer President-elect Donald Trump’s transition, the panel of the House Energy and Commerce Committee issued, as it exited the stage, a 413-page Final Report. Besides targeting Planned Parenthood, which receives more than $500 million annually in federal funding, much of it through the Medicaid health program for the poor, the report also takes to task research institutions, other abortion providers, and the companies that process and prepare fetal tissue for researchers. It accuses some of illegally profiting from the sale of fetal tissue, which is forbidden under the 1993 law. And it cites numerous examples to conclude that “human fetal tissue research makes a vanishingly small contribution to clinical and research efforts.” But a close look at those claims reveals inaccuracies; a sampling follows: (In seeming contradiction, the report goes on to state, one page later, that “11 [current vaccines] … are produced using historic, fetal-derived cell lines.”)Report, p 376:“… human fetal tissue has never been used to make the polio vaccine.”Fact: Virologists at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden used fetal cells to propagate a polio vaccine in the mid-1950s; it was given to some 2000 schoolchildren. In 1967 and 1968, Yugoslavia conducted a mass polio vaccination campaign using polio virus propagated in WI-38 cells; Sweden and Switzerland had already run trials of the same vaccine. In the early 1970s, Pfizer launched a polio vaccine propagated in WI-38 cells in the United States. And the French vaccinemaker Sanofi Pasteur uses MRC-5 cells to make polio vaccine to this day.Blackburn’s office did not respond to a request for comment on the errors. In a statement responding to the report, Planned Parenthood noted that three other congressional investigations and 13 state-level probes of the group, including one by a grand jury in Texas, have cleared Planned Parenthood of wrongdoing.last_img read more

  • Could this caterpillar help solve the worlds plastic bag problem

    first_img A developmental biologist and amateur beekeeper has come up with a new way to get rid of used plastic bags: Make waxworms eat them. The larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella), these caterpillars thrive on beeswax. While cleaning out empty hive boxes that were infested with these caterpillars, Federica Bertocchini of the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria in Spain put them in a plastic grocery bag. To her surprise the waxworms quickly ate their way out, leaving the bag riddled with holes. It turns out the caterpillars can break down the bag’s polyethylene into ethylene glycol, which can be readily converted into useful substances such as antifreeze, the team reports today in Current Biology. Polyethylene is very hard to break down, making the 80 million tons produced a year a big recycling challenge. Only recently have researchers begun to make progress doing so, and this caterpillar may be another solution. Correction, 25 April, 1:43 p.m.: The original version of this article stated that humans create 80 tons of polyethylene a year. We have corrected the story to reflect the fact that humans produce 80 million tons a year. By Elizabeth PennisiApr. 24, 2017 , 12:00 PM Could this caterpillar help solve the world’s plastic bag problem?last_img read more

  • Top stories Deafening rooster crows recordbreaking lasers and twin monkey clones

    first_img(LEFT TO RIGHT): PEXELS; UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER LABORATORY FOR LASER ENERGETICS/EUGENE KOWALUK; QIANG SUN AND MU-MING POO/CHINESE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES By Katie LanginJan. 26, 2018 , 2:50 PM How roosters protect themselves from their own deafening crowsA rooster’s crow is so loud, it can deafen you if you stand too close. So how do the birds keep their hearing? According to a new study, when a bird’s beak is fully open—as it is when crowing—a quarter of the ear canal completely closes and soft tissue covers 50% of the eardrum. This means roosters aren’t capable of hearing their own crows at full strength—even if you are. Physicists are planning to build lasers so powerful they could rip apart empty space Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Top stories: Deafening rooster crows, record-breaking lasers, and twin monkey clones Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Chinese physicists are breaking records with the most powerful pulses of light the world has ever seen. In 2016, their laser—called the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility—achieved an unprecedented 5.3 million billion watts. The researchers are now upgrading their laser and hope to beat their own record by the end of this year with a shot that would pack more than 1000 times the power of all the world’s electrical grids combined.These monkey twins are the first primate clones made by the method that developed DollyChinese scientists have produced two genetically identical long-tailed macaques using the same technique that gave us Dolly the sheep, the world’s first cloned mammal. The feat is a first for nonhuman primates, and it could one day lead to batches of genetically uniform monkeys for biomedical research. In the meantime, ethical questions abound.Scientists’ Doomsday Clock reaches 2 minutes to midnight, closest everThe Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced this week that it has moved its Doomsday Clock to 2 minutes before midnight, 30 seconds closer than last year, and the nearest we’ve been to annihilation since the world’s first hydrogen bombs were tested in 1952. The Bulletin attributed the uptick in danger to North Korea’s recent tests of missiles and nuclear weapons and the world’s lack of progress in confronting climate change.Dopamine may have given humans our social edge over other apesHumans are the ultimate social animals, with the ability to bond with mates, communicate through language, and make small talk with strangers on a packed bus. A new study suggests that the evolution of our unique social intelligence may have initially begun as a simple matter of brain chemistry, specifically neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine.last_img read more

  • Audacious science ideas win huge funding boosts after selection by TED group

    first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Dian Lofton/TED (CC BY-NC-ND) The reviewers for these proposals are not typically experts in the relevant fields, explains Audacious Project Executive Director Anna Verghese in New York City. Instead, they look at a team’s record of success, the idea’s potential for large-scale global impact, its sustainability, and its ability to attract philanthropy, she says. A consultant then works with each short listed project to make it more attractive to philanthropists. Each team ultimately filmed a video presentation for a panel of donors assembled by TED. Whenever donors commit to a project, they and TED set up milestones and reporting requirements and expected outcomes.Last year, the Audacious Project gave $35 million for the study of life in the mesopelagic ocean layer, $105 million to combat the widespread eye infection trachoma, and an undisclosed amount of money to a methane-monitoring satellite effort. This year, eight projects won funding; three had a strong science/research bent.Biochemist David Baker’s team at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle earned $45 million to support its efforts to synthesize designer proteins, which could lead to new drugs and vaccines, as well as for novel materials for producing and storing energy.The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, won $35 million to attempt to bioengineer crop plants that can sequester between 20% and 46% more carbon dioxide than usual, in bigger, deeper root systems and the spongy compound suberin. By Michael PriceApr. 23, 2019 , 5:40 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email ‘Audacious’ science ideas win huge funding boosts after selection by TED group David Baker, whose group won $45 million in funding from the Audacious Project, discusses designing novel proteins. Ryan Lash/TED (CC BY-NC-ND) Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The END Fund, headquartered in New York City, received $50 million for its work partnering with pharmaceutical companies and international governments and aid agencies to purchase and distribute existing drugs to combat tropical diseases caused by parasitic worms. It will also push for new drug development.Baker says this model for funding research isn’t generally aimed at developing totally new research ideas, but rather to scaling up existing, proven ones. “It’s really geared toward people who have something they’re excited about, that already exists, and they have a bigger vision for it,” he says.The Audacious Project’s funding system “has its pros and cons,” says Rick McCullough, vice provost for research at Harvard University. “Especially for these NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] and nonprofits, it’s hard to piece together these things with a million here and a million there, so this looks like a great thing for them.” But McCullough worries the system is not right for academic science. Existing federal funding agencies and foundations are better equipped to vet the science behind such proposals, he says. “It’s a kind of hubris for [TED] to say, ‘We know better how to pick projects than the funding agencies and foundations.’”Johnson disagrees. Even with traditional funding, he says, “Sometimes funds do not go to the best project proposals. To the extent that TED does a good job of disseminating information about the problems and the results of the research … everyone in the scientific enterprise [benefits].” At a meeting last week, Anna Verghese, director of the Audacious Project, and Chris Anderson, head of the TED group, detailed the fundraising success so far for eight ambitious projects, several of them focused on science. The TED organization, whose slick online video presentations have helped thousands of scientists and other thinkers reach huge audiences and potential financial backers, has jumped into the funding business itself. Last week, TED’s Audacious Project announced its second cohort of grantees, who will each receive tens of millions of dollars from donors. Among them are teams working to design improved proteins, eradicate parasitic diseases, and develop plants that counter global warming.David Johnson, a sociologist who studies trends in scientific funding at the University of Nevada in Reno, compares TED’s funding strategy to stock market investing. “In investment portfolio terms, federal agencies like the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health are like [an] index fund with diversified investment in science [whereas] Audacious is taking it to an extreme by making major investments in a few blue-chip scientific stocks.”This second funding round began when the organization put out a call for proposals, asking for just a few hundred words describing an idea and its scope. It received about 1500 initial applications. Officials within TED worked with a philanthropic consultancy called the Bridgespan Group in Boston to narrow that batch to a short list.last_img read more

  • Beauty Salon Talk Spending or Being Strapped for…

    first_imgLet’s be honest. When it comes to money, are you keeping it real with yourself or are you stuntin’? To often we put our self-worth into what other people think about us. We exchange a pound of financial freedom for an ounce of social status. But at the same time, it feels rewarding when you can truly own your own.That’s just one bit of insight that came out of a lively discussion when we went to a local beauty shop and posed the question to real women “how does money make you feel?”Joy, fear, anxiety, pride…Let’s talk about it. Relationships & Money: Being Truthful, Breaking Up, Bills Related Articles Barbershop Talk: Credit Challenges to Home Ownership LegacyProd Prudential Also On News One: center_img READ MORE Presented by READ MORE Prudential 20 Tweets Dragging Roseanne Barr To A White Privilege Helllast_img read more

  • Youth Art Show slated October 7

    first_imgSeptember 25, 2017 The High Desert Native American Youth Art Show and Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Navajo County Fairgrounds in Holbrook. The day will include localSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Youth Art Show slated October 7last_img

  • Smith reappointed as mayor of Taylor

    first_imgDecember 10, 2018 Photo by Toni GibbonsJustice of the Peace Judge Fred Peterson (right) swore in the newly-elected and re-elected council members at the Taylor Town Council meeting on Dec. 6. Pictured are (left to right) Jason Brubaker, Bill Baldwin, David Smith, Kyle Peck and Carl Cosper. Smith re-appointed as mayor of Taylorcenter_img By Toni Gibbons       The Taylor Town Council re-elected Mayor David Smith after saying farewell to Councilman Lynn DeWitt and welcoming Councilman-elect Bill Baldwin to sit in the vacated seat at the meeting on Dec.Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img read more

  • 14 opposition parties to take on govt with poll reform debate in

    first_imgOn Thursday, the Upper House is likely to take up a calling attention notice on drug abuse among children —- an issue that was raised in the House on Monday by Congress MP Motilal Vora.The parties that have so far signed the notice include the Congress, Trinamool Congress, RJD, SP, BSP, Aam Aadmi Party, CPI, PDP, CPI(M), DMK, Kerala Congress (Mani), IUML and NCP.Sources said this is the first of many joint notices to come, as the parties, even while cooperating with the government in legislative business, try to get their points of view across in a House where the numbers are increasingly getting skewed in favour of the Treasury benches. The Rajya Sabha has worked without any disruptions so far – not even when the government decided to push through a Bill on teachers’ quota in educational institutions without adequate notice.On Tuesday, the House managed to take up all 15 starred questions listed for oral answers during Question Hour. Thirty-six members from 13 political parties and one nominated member – K T. S Tulsi – raised the main questions and supplementary questions.Besides O’Brien, leaders expected to speak during the electoral reforms debate on Wednesday are Kapil Sibal (Congress), Satish Mishra (BSP), Majeed Memon (NCP), and D Raja (CPI). Although the notice does not specifically mention electronic voting machines, the Opposition’s misgivings about the machines will be voiced by speakers during the discussion, it is learnt.Several parties participating in the discussion have been pressing for a return to ballot papers. 0 Comment(s) P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Congress raises China transgression, Rajnath Singh says borders secure Parliament Monsoon Session, General Election, Lok sabha elections, Rajya Sabha, electoral reforms, Trinamool Congress, Derek O’Brien, Indian express The parties that have so far signed the notice include the Congress, Trinamool Congress, RJD, SP, BSP, Aam Aadmi Party, CPI, PDP, CPI(M), DMK, Kerala Congress (Mani), IUML and NCP.In the first such concerted Opposition effort to pin the government down since the BJP-led NDA’s massive win in the General Election, the Rajya Sabha will, on Wednesday, take up discussion on a notice on electoral reforms. The notice has been submitted by Trinamool Congress leader Derek O’Brien and will see 14 opposition parties participate. Advertising Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Advertisingcenter_img What steps taken to tackle patriarchy in farm sector: BJD MP Bhartruhari Mahtab An MP from an opposition party who is one of the signatories in the notice said, “A decision has been taken that every week the opposition parties will jointly move for one short duration discussion and one calling attention motion in Rajya Sabha. The consensus today was on electoral reforms. Although the notice only says electoral reforms, given the present state, it goes without saying that EVMs are not conducive to free and fair elections and it is time we returned to ballot papers. So naturally it will come up.”Many of these opposition parties had stayed away from the meeting called by Prime Minister Narendra Modi last month to discuss his vision of “One Nation, One Election”. The discussion will provide them a platform to air their views on the matter. Opposition criticises low priority to agriculture in Budget Best Of Express Chandrayaan-2 launch on July 22 at 2.43 pm: ISRO Related News Written by Abantika Ghosh | New Delhi | Published: July 3, 2019 2:36:44 amlast_img read more

  • No need to take Zawahiri threats seriously MEA

    first_imgBy Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 12, 2019 6:26:53 am Alerted nations in Pacific Ocean region on missing Kerala vessel with 243 onboard, no response yet: MEA kerala missing vessel, vessel goes missing from kerala, missing persons in kerala, raveesh kumar, mea, ministry of external affairs, kerala news MEA spokesperson Raveesh Kumar. (File)A day after a video emerged of al-Qaeda chief Ayman al-Zawahiri asking militants in Kashmir to focus on inflicting “unrelenting blows” on the Indian Army, the Ministry of External Affairs on Thursday said India’s security forces are capable and equipped to protect the country’s territorial integrity and sovereignty.“We keep hearing of such threats and it is not the first time that we received such a threat. I don’t think we need to take it seriously,” said MEA spokesperson Raveesh Kumar. “Our security forces are capable and equipped… not to worry about these threats.” Related News Government formally requests Malaysia to extradite Zakir Naik Four Indian women duped by employer in Dubai rescued: MEA 1 Comment(s)last_img read more